Pastor Chuck R. Swindoll's Insight For Living (Weekdays)

Syndicate content
Recent videos from your favorite ministries
Updated: 1 day 1 hour ago

Sustaining Enthusiasm, Part 1

17 hours 31 min ago

“Familiarity breeds contempt” is an old cliché because it’s nearly always true. However, before contempt, familiarity also breeds complacency—that ho-hum attitude keeping us way too comfortable with the status quo. Complacency  is in the same troublesome family as cynicism, a kissing cousin of contempt.

 

Overexposure to spiritual things can both dampen our enthusiasm and damage our awe for God. That’s what happened to the ancient Israelites before they entered the Promised Land. Daily miracles became ho-hum experiences as God’s people grew more complacent, cynical, and contemptuous. But God had a stern word for them . . . and for us: Sustain your enthusiasm or you may pay a heavy price. 

What to Do When You've Blown it, Part 3

Thu, 04/27/2017 - 4:00am

We’ve come to the end of this Biblical Parenting message series. It’s been a journey of discovery for many. We’ve probed the Scriptures from start to finish to find out what God thinks and says about this all-important subject related to many of the vital relationships within the home and family. We’ve covered a broad spectrum—everything from the embryo in a mother’s womb to parenting our grown kids. We have relied on God’s Word to guide our thinking. While we’re grateful for biblical instruction, there are times when Scripture can be very disquieting. This occurs when we compare what God has written with how we have failed to do things His way. We often say to ourselves at such times, “If only I had known then what I know now.” This results in feelings of deep regret and anxiety, especially in the hearts of parents who “blew it.” Since there is no way to go back and relive our lives, we need to focus on the best way to respond to these painful memories. Otherwise, we will live under clouds of blame and shame, paralyzed by guilt.

What to Do When You’ve Blown It, Part 2

Wed, 04/26/2017 - 4:00am

We’ve come to the end of this Biblical Parenting message series. It’s been a journey of discovery for many. We’ve probed the Scriptures from start to finish to find out what God thinks and says about this all-important subject related to many of the vital relationships within the home and family. We’ve covered a broad spectrum—everything from the embryo in a mother’s womb to parenting our grown kids. We have relied on God’s Word to guide our thinking. While we’re grateful for biblical instruction, there are times when Scripture can be very disquieting. This occurs when we compare what God has written with how we have failed to do things His way. We often say to ourselves at such times, “If only I had known then what I know now.” This results in feelings of deep regret and anxiety, especially in the hearts of parents who “blew it.” Since there is no way to go back and relive our lives, we need to focus on the best way to respond to these painful memories. Otherwise, we will live under clouds of blame and shame, paralyzed by guilt.

What to Do When You’ve Blown It, Part 1

Tue, 04/25/2017 - 4:00am

We’ve come to the end of this Biblical Parenting message series. It’s been a journey of discovery for many. We’ve probed the Scriptures from start to finish to find out what God thinks and says about this all-important subject related to many of the vital relationships within the home and family. We’ve covered a broad spectrum—everything from the embryo in a mother’s womb to parenting our grown kids. We have relied on God’s Word to guide our thinking. While we’re grateful for biblical instruction, there are times when Scripture can be very disquieting. This occurs when we compare what God has written with how we have failed to do things His way. We often say to ourselves at such times, “If only I had known then what I know now.” This results in feelings of deep regret and anxiety, especially in the hearts of parents who “blew it.” Since there is no way to go back and relive our lives, we need to focus on the best way to respond to these painful memories. Otherwise, we will live under clouds of blame and shame, paralyzed by guilt.

Suggestions for Parenting Grown-up Kids, Part 3

Mon, 04/24/2017 - 4:00am

Living harmoniously as a family is an ongoing, intentional journey. The beginning of that journey is marked by great anticipation and genuine excitement. A bride and groom have high hopes and great dreams as they start out life together. However, as in all journeys, there are unexpected challenges the couple will surely face. Those challenges include the arrival of children, which requires the couple to cultivate valuable parenting skills—without a handbook to follow! As each child grows, parents continue to adapt and adjust. Each age, from preschool through elementary school, requires adjustments along the way in order to keep the relationships harmonious. About the time we get our arms around all of that, the teenage years arrive! This time can be stretching and complicated, but it need not be impossible. It calls for even more adjustments and a greater willingness to change if we hope to sustain harmony in the home. And then—a brand-new set of challenges arrive: our children reach adulthood, with a mind of their own. Can there still be mutual respect and meaningful relationships in the family? How can that all-important harmony be continued between parents and their grown-up kids?

Suggestions for Parenting Grown-Up Kids, Part 2

Fri, 04/21/2017 - 4:00am

Living harmoniously as a family is an ongoing, intentional journey. The beginning of that journey is marked by great anticipation and genuine excitement. A bride and groom have high hopes and great dreams as they start out life together. However, as in all journeys, there are unexpected challenges the couple will surely face. Those challenges include the arrival of children, which requires the couple to cultivate valuable parenting skills—without a handbook to follow! As each child grows, parents continue to adapt and adjust. Each age, from preschool through elementary school, requires adjustments along the way in order to keep the relationships harmonious. About the time we get our arms around all of that, the teenage years arrive! This time can be stretching and complicated, but it need not be impossible. It calls for even more adjustments and a greater willingness to change if we hope to sustain harmony in the home. And then—a brand-new set of challenges arrive: our children reach adulthood, with a mind of their own. Can there still be mutual respect and meaningful relationships in the family? How can that all-important harmony be continued between parents and their grown-up kids?