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Evening Crowdfunding Roundup

Recent Blue's News Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 5:01pm
Project Liane - Steam Greenlight. "Project Liane is a stealth based third-person shooter with an interactive storytelling aspect."

Evening Consolidation

Recent Blue's News Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 5:01pm
Try Out The Crew For Free, Keep Your Progress If You Buy. This Week?s Xbox Deals with Gold.

Evening Metaverse

Recent Blue's News Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 5:01pm
Brands swoop in to buy .porn and .sucks before the trolls do. Thanks HARDOCP. What's new on reddit: Announcing embeddable comment threads. If the Internet was a High School.

Evening Tech Bits

Recent Blue's News Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 5:01pm
'Virtual nose' may reduce simulator sickness in video games. Nielsen reports that the average American adult spends 11 hours per day on gadgets. Thanks Ant.

Evening Safety Dance

Recent Blue's News Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 5:01pm
Thanks j.c.f. Researchers map Drupal attack that bypasses poorly tuned Web Application Firewalls. Thanks Linux Security via Ant. Fake patient data could have been uploaded through SAP medical app....

etc., etc.

Recent Blue's News Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 5:01pm
Skywind mod trailer shows more from Morrowind. Thanks JDreyer… Bloodborne fans on PC start a petition -- but Sony has already said it won't port it…

Into the Black

Recent Blue's News Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 5:01pm
Link of the Day: TIE Fighter - short film. Amazing.

Public Records Request Returns 4.6M License Plate Scans From Oakland PD

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 4:17pm
schwit1 points out a report from Ars Technica on how they used a public records request to acquire an entire License Plate Reader dataset from the Oakland Police Department. The dataset includes 4.6 million total reads from 1.1 million unique plates. They built a custom visualization tool to demonstrate how this data could be abused. "For instance, during a meeting with an Oakland city council member, Ars was able to accurately guess the block where the council member lives after less than a minute of research using his license plate data. Similarly, while "working" at an Oakland bar mere blocks from Oakland police headquarters, we ran a plate from a car parked in the bar's driveway through our tool. The plate had been read 48 times over two years in two small clusters: one near the bar and a much larger cluster 24 blocks north in a residential area—likely the driver's home." Though the Oakland PD has periodically deleted data to free up space — the 4.6 million records were strewn across 18 different Excel spreadsheets with hundreds of thousands of lines each — there is no formal retention limit.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Australian Company Creates Even Faster 3D Printer

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 3:34pm
ErnieKey writes: One of the major reasons 3D printing hasn't really caught on is because it's an incredibly slow process. Just last week a company called Carbon3D unveiled a super fast new 3D printing process that utilizes oxygen and light. Now, another company — Gizmo 3D — has unveiled an even faster 3D printing process which is claimed to be more reliable than the process presented by Carbon3D. It can print 30mm in height at a 50 micron resolution in just 6 minutes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ford's New Car Tech Prevents You From Accidentally Speeding

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 2:52pm
An anonymous reader sends word of Ford's new "Intelligent Speed Limiter" technology, which they say will prevent drivers from unintentionally exceeding the speed limit. When the system is activated (voluntarily) by the driver, it asks for a current maximum speed. From then on, a camera mounted on the windshield will scan the road ahead for speed signs, and automatically adjust the maximum speed to match them. The system can also pull speed limit data from navigation systems. When the system detects the car exceeding the speed limit, it won't automatically apply the brakes — rather, it will deliver less fuel to the engine until the vehicle's speed drops below the limit. If the speed still doesn't drop, a warning noise will sound. The driver can override the speed limit by pressing "firmly" on the accelerator. The technology is being launched in Europe with the Ford S-MAX.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Feds Attempt To Censor Parts of a New Book About the Hydrogen Bomb

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 2:10pm
HughPickens.com writes: The atom bomb — leveler of Hiroshima and instant killer of some 80,000 people — is just a pale cousin compared to the hydrogen bomb, which easily packs the punch of a thousand Hiroshimas. That is why Washington has for decades done everything in its power to keep the details of its design out of the public domain. Now William J. Broad reports in the NY Times that Kenneth W. Ford has defied a federal order to cut material from his new book that the government says teems with thermonuclear secrets. Ford says he included the disputed material because it had already been disclosed elsewhere and helped him paint a fuller picture of an important chapter of American history. But after he volunteered the manuscript for a security review, federal officials told him to remove about 10 percent of the text, or roughly 5,000 words. "They wanted to eviscerate the book," says Ford. "My first thought was, 'This is so ridiculous I won't even respond.'" For instance, the federal agency wanted him to strike a reference to the size of the first hydrogen test device — its base was seven feet wide and 20 feet high. Dr. Ford responded that public photographs of the device, with men, jeeps and a forklift nearby, gave a scale of comparison that clearly revealed its overall dimensions. Though difficult to make, hydrogen bombs are attractive to nations and militaries because their fuel is relatively cheap. Inside a thick metal casing, the weapon relies on a small atom bomb that works like a match to ignite the hydrogen fuel. Today, Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States are the only declared members of the thermonuclear club, each possessing hundreds or thousands of hydrogen bombs. Military experts suspect that Israel has dozens of hydrogen bombs. India, Pakistan and North Korea are seen as interested in acquiring the potent weapon. The big secret the book discusses is thermal equilibrium, the discovery that the temperature of the hydrogen fuel and the radiation could match each other during the explosion (PDF). World Scientific, a publisher in Singapore, recently made Dr. Ford's book public in electronic form, with print versions to follow. Ford remains convinced the book "contains nothing whatsoever whose dissemination could, by any stretch of the imagination, damage the United States or help a country that is trying to build a hydrogen bomb." "Were I to follow all — or even most — of your suggestions," says Ford, "it would destroy the book."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Brief History of Graphics


"A complete edit of a 5-part series: http://goo.gl/ilCrn5 ..."


MuseScore 2.0 Released

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 1:27pm
rDouglass writes: MuseScore, the open source desktop application for music notation, has released version 2.0 for Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows. This release represents the culmination of four years of development, including technical contributions from over 400 people. In addition to a completely new UI, top features include linked parts (good for pieces with many instruments), guitar tablature, flexible chord symbols, and fret diagrams. The program integrates directly with the MuseScore.com online library of scores, and music written with the application can be displayed and played using the MuseScore mobile app.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Jupiter Destroyed 'Super-Earths' In Our Early Solar System

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 12:45pm
sciencehabit writes: If Jupiter and Saturn hadn't formed where they did—and at the sizes they did—as the disk of dust and gas around our sun coalesced, then our solar system would be a very different and possibly more hostile place, new research suggests (abstract). Computer models reveal that in the solar system's first 3 million years or so, gravitational interactions with Jupiter, Saturn, and the gas in the protoplanetary disk would have driven super-Earth–sized planets closer to the sun and into increasingly elliptical orbits. In such paths, a cascade of collisions would have blasted any orbs present there into ever smaller bits, which in turn would have been slowed by the interplanetary equivalent of atmospheric drag and eventually plunged into the sun. As Jupiter retreated from its closest approach to the sun, it left behind the mostly rocky remnants that later coalesced into our solar system's inner planets, including Earth.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Better Disaster Shelters than FEMA Trailers (Video)

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 12:04pm
An aerospace engineer and Mississippi native named Michael McDaniel "watched helplessly as Hurricane Katrina forced thousands of people out of their homes and into crowded, poorly equipped 'shelters.'" This scenario led to Michael founding Reaction Housing and the creation of its first product, the Exo (as in exoskeleton) shelter. This company isn't holding its hand out for crowdfunding. It got $1.5 million in seed capital in March, 2014, later got another $10 million, and is now going into mass production of its Exo housing units. Reaction Housing is not the only attempt to make post-disaster housing better, or at least less expensive, than the infamous FEMA trailers. A charity called ShelterBox in Lakewood Ranch, FL, fills boxes with everything a family or group of up to 10 people needs, including a heavy-duty tent, bedding, and kitchen supplies, in order to survive after a natural disaster. (Here's an interview video I shot in 2010 about ShelterBox.) Exo, ShelterBox or any one of dozens of other emergency housing alternatives are good to have around, ready to go, for the next Katrina, Sandy or Tsunami. High tech? Not necessarily, but technology has obviously made emergency housing faster and easier to erect than the "earthquake shacks" that were built in San Francisco to house people made homeless by the 1906 earthquake.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Energy Company Trials Computer Servers To Heat Homes

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 11:18am
New submitter MarcAuslander sends this Associated Press report: Eneco, a Dutch-based energy company with more than 2 million customers, said Tuesday it is installing 'e-Radiators' — computer servers that generate heat while crunching numbers — in five homes across the Netherlands in a trial to see if their warmth could be a commercially viable alternative for traditional radiators. The technology is the brainchild of the Dutch startup company Nerdalize, whose founders claim to have developed the idea after huddling near a laptop to keep warm after their home's thermostat broke and jokingly suggesting buying 100 laptops. Nerdalize says its e-Radiators offer companies or research institutes a cheaper alternative to housing servers in data centers. And because Nerdalize foots the power bill for the radiators, Eneco customers get the warmth they generate for free. The companies said the environment wins, too, because energy is effectively used twice in the new system - to power the servers and to heat rooms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The X-Files To Return

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 10:36am
An anonymous reader writes: Fox announced today that The X-Files will return with six new episodes. David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson will both reprise their roles as Mulder and Scully, respectively, and show creator Chris Carter will return as well. Production begins this summer, but air dates are not yet known. The X-Files originally started in 1993 and ran for 9 seasons, spawning two feature films and a short-lived spinoff called The Lone Gunmen. It won 16 Emmy awards and 5 Golden Globe awards before critical reception soured over the last few seasons. Carter said, "I think of it as a 13-year commercial break. The good news is the world has only gotten that much stranger, a perfect time to tell these six stories."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Kilauea - The Fire Within

Ant's Vimeo Likes - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 10:01am

Available in 4K, The Fire Within is a visceral, artistic study on the Big Island of Hawaii's hyperactive Kilauea volcano. I was born and raised on the island and all my life up until last year I hadn't had the chance to come face to face with her incredible presence.

Many in Hawaii refer to the lava as 'Pele', the Hawaiian goddess of fire. After our incredible experiences at the volcano it's not hard to see why so many islanders to this day see her as a living breathing thing. I wanted to capture her beauty and mysteriousness as well as her unimaginable power in the best way that I knew how. I wanted to just see it doing what it does. I shied away from any human interaction and turned the cameras to the fiery blood of the Earth.

This six and a half minute film is my best attempt at capturing what it felt like to witness molten rock slowly burning down a dense wet rainforest or to peer into a six-hundred-foot-wide lava lake at Kilauea's summit crater. I've never been anywhere else on the planet that demanded as much respect and awareness for the natural environment around me. Her unexpected beauty and unsettling sense of danger were nothing short of humbling and put so much into perspective. Kilauea really did change my life.

Huge thanks to those who supported this film along the way, especially Wes and Stefan for contributing so much time and talent to make this thing what it is. Kilauea - The Fire Within was produced out of pocket and with complete creative freedom.

Director/DP/Editor: Lance Page
pagefilms.com
facebook.com/pagefilms
instagram.com/pagefilms
twitter.com/pagefilms

Producers: Lance Page & Wesley Young

Original Score: Stefan Scott Nelson
soundcloud.com/stefonz-1

featuring Starsieve
soundcloud.com/search?q=starsieve

Gear:
Canon EOS 6D
Panasonic Lumix GH4
Canon 24-105L F4
Canon 70-300L F4-5.6
Rokinon 14mm F2.8
Rokinon 24mm T1.5
Emotimo TB3
emotimo.com
Dynamic Perception Stage Zero
dynamicperception.com
Radian and Michron controllers
alpinelaboratories.com

©2015 PageFilms

Cast: Page Films

Tags: Kilauea, Kilauea Caldera, Lava, Lava Flow, Pahoa, Halemaumau, Lava Lake, June 27th Lava Flow, Volcano, Puna Lava Flow, Hawaii, Big Island and TheFireWithin

Chinese CA Issues Certificates To Impersonate Google

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 9:54am
Trailrunner7 writes: Google security engineers, investigating fraudulent certificates issued for several of the company's domains, discovered that a Chinese certificate authority was using an intermediate CA, MCS Holdings, that issued the unauthorized Google certificates, and could have issued certificates for virtually any domain. Google's engineers were able to block the fraudulent certificates in the company's Chrome browser by pushing an update to the CRLset, which tracks revoked certificates. The company also alerted other browser vendors to the problem, which was discovered on March 20. Google contacted officials at CNNIC, the Chinese registrar who authorized the intermediate CA, and the officials said that they were working with MCS to issue certificates for domains that it registered. But, instead of simply doing that, and storing the private key for the registrar in a hardware security module, MCS put the key in a proxy device designed to intercept secure traffic.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Ask Slashdot: What Happened To Semantic Publishing?

Recent /. Posts - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 9:11am
An anonymous reader writes There has always been a demand for semantically enriched content, even long before the digital era. Take a look at the New York Times Index, which has been continuously published since 1913. Nowadays, technology can meet the high demands for "clever" content, and big publishers like the BBC and the NY Times are opening their data and also making a good use of it. In this post, the author argues that Semantic Publishing is the future and talks about articles enriched with relevant facts and infoboxes with related content. Yet his example dates back to 2010, and today arguably every news website suggests related articles and provides links to external sources. This raises several questions: Why is there not much noise on this topic lately? Does this mean that we are already in the future of Online (Semantic) Publishing? Do we have all the tools now (e.g. Linked Data, fast NoSQL/Graph/RDF datastores, etc.) and what remains to be done is simply refinement and evolution? What is the difference in "cleverness" of content from different providers?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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