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Half of U.S. I.T. Operations Jobs to Vanish

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A MacCentral article says Gartner, Inc. researchers believe that as many as 50 percent of the IT operational jobs in the U.S. could disappear over the next two decades because of improvements in data center technologies.

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Lying Makes Brain Work Harder

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This Wired News article say it seems to take more brain effort to tell the lie than to tell the truth according to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans.

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"Pro-Ams" -- Amateurs who pursue a hobby or pastime to a professional standard.

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ZDNet UK News' article say coders, who give up their spare time to contribute to open source projects, are the virtual equivalent of lifeboat men. This is according to latest research from Demos Britain's open-source software developers make a valuable contribution to society and the British economy through the high quality of their work, according to Demos.

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Surgery Removes Man's Sixth Finger and Toes

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Yahoo! News' story mentions Tirso Furcal having a sixth finger projecting from one hand and an extra toe on each foot. They made life in his impoverished country, the Dominican Republic, even more difficult. The condition made walking painful, caused the stone-polisher frequent injuries and blocked his hopes for better-paying work.

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Laser treatment zaps bad breath

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CNN has a story about laser treatment that can zap bad breath. Yehuda Finkelstein of Meir Hospital at the Sapir Medical Centre in Kfar Saba, Israel has successfully treated 53 patients suffering from bad breath, or halitosis, with a new, 15-minute technique.

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U.S. Throws Away Half Its Food

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Science a GoGo's article says recently researchers from the University of Arizona have quantified what gets thrown aways as a percentage of what is produced. Astonishingly, a new study has found that forty to fifty percent of all food ready for harvest never gets eaten.

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Mom/Mum/Mother as the #1 beautiful word and other top words...

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BBC NEWS' article says mother is the most beautiful word in the English language, according to a survey of non-English speakers. More than 40,000 people in 102 countries were polled by the British Council to mark its 70th anniversary.

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Anger Management May Not Help at All

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This New York Times' article (no registration and log in required) says anger-management classes may not help. They show the weakness of a common assumption: that anger can be treated almost as if it were an infection, with a course of anger-management classes instead of antibiotics.

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Scientists reveal the 'couch potato gene'

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According to Kerala News' article, watching TVs for hours is to be blamed on your genetic make-up. A team of scientist in Australia have recently discovered the 'couch potato gene.' According to study, which was presented at the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress in Sydney, the gene is responsible for making some people more active than others and people who have this gene are usually not inclined towards physical exercises.

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Brawl Games: A List of Fan-Player Melees

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ESPN has an article about past fan-player melees after the recent ugly NBA brawl. It lists incidents from various sports.

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12MANY: How many stars do you see?

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12MANY is a simple Web Flash game that makes you count the stars in one flash and answer within a time limit. I got 42 points and man, do I suck!

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AFI's Top 100 to show the money quotes

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This CNN story talks about The American Film Institute (AFI) surveying Hollywood types for the top 100 quotes from U.S. movies.

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The Worst Jobs in Science: The Sequel

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Popular Science has another short article on the worst jobs in science. Examples:

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Disabled dolphin jumping again with world's first artificial fin

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This Yahoo! News story mentions Fuji, a mother dolphin that lost 75 percent of her tail due to a mysterious disease, being able to jump again with the help of what is believed to be the world's first artificial fin.

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Study: Heavy computer use linked to glaucoma...

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According to Yahoo! News' story and /.'s story, heavy users of computers especially those who are short-sighted, may be at risk from glaucoma, a disease that can cause blindness, a study published in a specialist journal on Tuesday says.

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A software developer's annoying musical resume/CV in Flash...

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A French computer programmer/software developer made an annoying resume/CV in Flash. It is musical (French) and has English subtitles. This is the incorrect way to find a job!

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How to smash a computer...

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This BBC News' article says: "Although computer malfunctions remain the most common cause of file loss, data recovery experts say human behaviour still is to blame in many cases. They say that no matter how effective technology is at rescuing files, users should take more time to back-up and protect important files. The list of the top 10 global data disasters was compiled by recovery company Ontrack."

Here are some amusing and sad incidents the article listed:

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Even Digital Memories Can Fade

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This New York Time's article (thanks N.Y. Times Link Generator for registrationless access) talks about digital data can fade away. The nation's 115 million home computers are brimming over with personal treasures -- millions of photographs, music of every genre, college papers, the great American novel and, of course, mountains of e-mail messages. Yet no one has figured out how to preserve these electronic materials for the next decade, much less for the ages. Like junk e-mail, the problem of digital archiving, which seems straightforward, confounds even the experts.

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Roman cosmetic secrets revealed

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This BBC News story says Roman cosmetic secrets revealed. The fashion conscious women of Roman Britain used a tin-based foundation to get a pale and appealing look.

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Obesity Raising Airline Fuel Costs

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According to Yahoo! News' story, airlines increasingly have to worry more about the weight of their passengers according to a new federal government study. America's growing waistlines are hurting the bottom lines of airline companies as the extra pounds on passengers are causing a drag on planes. Heavier fliers have created heftier fuel costs.

Through the 1990s, the average weight of Americans increased by 10 pounds, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (news - web sites). The extra weight caused airlines to spend $275 million to burn 350 million more gallons of fuel in 2000 just to carry the additional weight of Americans, the federal agency estimated in a recent issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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